Omer

Aug 072019
 

This is a post about listedness: what is the nature of the idiosyncratic information that is listed in the grammar.

In traditional, lexicalist approaches, the listed atoms were lexical items. A lexical item contained, at minimum, a phonological form, a semantic interpretation, [...]

[read more]

New version of paper “The Anaphor Agreement Effect: further evidence against binding-as-agreement”

 Posted by on 07/24/2019  Comments Off on New version of paper “The Anaphor Agreement Effect: further evidence against binding-as-agreement”
Jul 242019
 

I’ve posted a new version of my paper “The Anaphor Agreement Effect: further evidence against binding-as-agreement.” It is somewhat unusual for a ‘new version’, in that the paper has been completely rewritten, top to bottom, following some feedback from reviewers! You can read more about this project on my research page. […]  [read more]

Jun 082019
 

There’s been a fair amount of generative linguistics work over the past 15 years or so that identifies itself as “morphosemantics.” There are several reasons why I don’t think morphosemantics is a coherent notion. In this post, I’d like to detail some of these reasons. You’ve probably heard ~1.5 of them before, though, so if that’s the case feel free to skip ahead as needed. […]  [read more]

Mar 052019
 

Here is a paper by Canaan Breiss and Bruce Hayes (I will refer to the paper as B&H). To offer a brief summary of B&H’s main empirical point, it shows that the choice of syntactic ‘structure’ (i.e., both the choice of terminals and their arrangement) is probabilistically biased towards avoiding phonotactically problematic sequences (e.g. a sequence of two consecutive sibilants), even when the sequence in question arises across a word boundary. It does so by focusing on a series of well-established phonological constraints (from work on word‑level phonology), and showing that word‑bigrams whose juncture violates these constraints are underattested. This is shown to be the case in a variety of corpora, both written and spoken. Let’s refer to this as Evidence for Phonologically-Influenced Choice of Syntactic Structure, or EPICSS for short. […]  [read more]